“The Lost Boys: Hard-To-Find ’80s Albums” gives you exactly what the title implies: a rare or out-of-print album from the ’80s in its entirety. Some will be from CD, but most will have been lovingly transferred from pristine vinyl culled directly from the Analog Kid’s vast collection. Whatever album I choose, it will be one that you can’t easily find a physical copy for sale on Amazon or in your local record store (if you even have one anymore). Death…by stereo!

 

Bowie DJ

 

I had a very bad day yesterday. I had a delicious bacon-and-eggs breakfast with my in-laws in Austin, but I paid the price for the next few hours thanks to the worst case of heartburn you could possibly imagine. On our way back to Dallas later in the afternoon, the transmission on my car locked up and we barely made it home (let’s not even discuss what the repair is going to cost!). I then spent the evening watching a bunch of Hollywood assholes jerk each other off– what a joy! After my wife went to bed, I poured myself a nice glass of bourbon and settled in to watch a few episodes of my newest Netflix addiction (how had I never seen The West Wing before last week?). I was finally going to relax and try to forget about my bad day.

And then David Bowie died. And that’s about all I have to say about that.

Changestwobowie was a compilation album released in 1981 by RCA Records. It contained Bowie’s hit singles released after 1976’s Changesbowie best-of, and also featured some songs from his earlier years that didn’t make the cut for volume one. Changestwobowie was released briefly on CD in the mid-’80s, but it went out of print after Bowie’s catalog moved from RCA to Rykodisc and has never been reissued. I spent this afternoon mourning his loss by listening to many of my vintage Bowie LPs, and in the process I created a new 320 kbps vinyl rip of my original copy of Changestwobowie. There are a few tracks on the album that I had forgotten about over the years (check out the almost-disco remake version of “John I’m Only Dancing!”), and listening to it made me smile and feel a little bit better. Thank you, David, for all of the incredible music you created over the past fifty years. I didn’t always love everything that you released, but I loved that you never stopped changing…

 

Ashes to ashes, funk to funky

We know Major Tom’s a junkie.

 

Changestwobowie 1

David Bowie: Changestwobowie

RCA Records, 1981

320 kbps vinyl rip courtesy of The Analog Kid

 

1. “Aladdin Sane (1913-1973-197?)” (David Bowie/Mann/Weil/Leiber/Stoller)

Aladdin Sane (1913-1938-197?)

2. “Oh! You Pretty Things” (David Bowie)

Oh! You Pretty Things

3. “Starman” (David Bowie)

Starman

4. “1984” (David Bowie)

1984

5. “Ashes To Ashes” [7″ Version] (David Bowie)

Ashes To Ashes [7″ Version]

6. “Sound And Vision” (David Bowie)

Sound And Vision

7. “Fashion” [7″ Version] (David Bowie)

Fashion [7″ Version]

8. “Wild Is The Wind” (Dimitri Tiomkin/Ned Washington)

Wild Is The Wind

9. “John I’m Only Dancing (Again) 1975” (David Bowie)

John I’m Only Dancing (Again) 1975

10. “D.J.” [7″ Version] (David Bowie/Brian Eno/Carlos Alomar)

D.J. [7″ Version]

______________________________________________________________

Bonus Tracks!

The first rule of The Analog Kid blog is that if you write about a song on the Analog Kid blog, you share the song on the Analog Kid blog.

 

Hunky Dory

David Bowie: “Changes” (David Bowie)

From the album Hunky Dory

RCA Records, 1971

Changes

About The Analog Kid

"I'm 5-foot-8, 123 pounds. I have, uh, brown hair, blue eyes. I enjoy surfing, backgammon and men who aren't afraid to cry."

2 responses »

  1. Mark says:

    I always thought that the version of Changes included all the tunes from the first and second changes, but clearly I was wrong about that. Half of this album was not included, so thanks once again for bringing this album to my attention.

  2. Leo says:

    The last year or so has seen the death of so many music legends, but none of them hit me as hard as Bowie. Like yourself, I can’t find the words. The recent HBO series, Vinyl, aired an episode soon after he died that featured a young performer, circa ’73, playing Bowie’s “LIfe On Mars” in a piano lounge. Totally gutted me. A brief but beautiful tribute.

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