The Lost Boys: Hard-To-Find ’80s Albums (“Acadie” By Daniel Lanois)

“The Lost Boys: Hard-To-Find ’80s Albums” gives you exactly what the title implies: a rare or out-of-print album from the ’80s in its entirety. Some will be from CD, but most will have been lovingly transferred from pristine vinyl culled directly from the Analog Kid’s vast collection. Whatever album I choose, it will be one that you can’t easily find a physical copy for sale on Amazon or in your local record store (if you even have one anymore). Death…by stereo!

 

Lanois

Daniel Lanois was the man behind the board for some of my favorite albums of the ’80s: Peter Gabriel’s So, U2’s The Joshua Tree, the debut solo album from Robbie Robertson…the list goes on and on. When I found out that Lanois had released a record of his own in late 1989, I went straight to Waterloo Records and shelled out $14.99 for Acadie without even hearing a single track from the album. A risky move for a poor college student? Perhaps, but I also knew that the man who had helped craft sonic masterpieces like “Mercy Street” and “Somewhere Down The Crazy River” wouldn’t let me down. And he didn’t– Acadie is an album that I still listen to on a regular basis, especially when I need to calm the #@&% down (and as anyone who knows me will tell you, that is a very common occurrence).

The list of guest players on Acadie is impressive (Aaron Neville, Brian Eno, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jr., Bill Dillon), but it’s Lanois’ expressive vocals (some in English, some in French– sometimes on the same song!) and guitar work that really shine. Of course, Lanois’ production on the record is stunning– the man is a master at creating landscapes that are somehow both sparse and luxurious at the same time. Take a listen to “Still Water”– I love the subtle rhythm work from Adam and Larry, and the eerie yet beautiful backing vocals still give me chills after all of these years. It’s a perfect song to open the album.

The original Opal/Warner Brothers CD pressing of Acadie has been out of print for a number of years now, and even the 2008 reissue is getting harder and harder to find.  Lanois autographed my original CD copy after a show in Dallas in 2003, and he couldn’t have been a nicer guy. The Analog Kid hopes you enjoy this sonic masterpiece from one of my favorite artists…

 

Acadie Signed

 

Daniel Lanois: Acadie

Opal/Warner Bros. Records, 1989

 

1. “Still Water” (Lanois)

Still Water

2. “The Maker” (Lanois)

The Maker

3. “O Marie” (Lanois)

O Marie

4. “Jolie Louise” (Lanois)

Jolie Louise

5. “Fisherman’s Daughter” (Lanois)

Fisherman’s Daughter

6. “White Mustang II” (Lanois/Brian Eno)

White Mustang II

7. “Under A Stormy Sky” (Lanois)

Under A Stormy Sky

8. “Where The Hawkwind Kills” (Lanois)

Where The Hawkwind Kills

9. “Silium’s Hill” (Lanois)

Silium’s Hill

10. “Ice” (Lanois)

Ice

11. “St. Ann’s Gold” (Lanois/Malcolm Burn)

St. Ann’s Gold

12. “Amazing Grace” (Trad.\ Arranged By Lanois/John Newton)

Amazing Grace

____________________________________________________

Bonus Tracks!

The first rule of The Analog Kid blog is that if you write about a song on the Analog Kid blog, you share the song on the Analog Kid blog.

 

So

Peter Gabriel: “Mercy Street” (Peter Gabriel)

From the album So

Geffen Records, 1986

Mercy Street

 

Oh Mercy

Bob Dylan: “Most Of The Time” (Bob Dylan)

From the album Oh Mercy

Columbia Records, 1989

Most Of The Time

 

Robbie Robertson

Robbie Robertson: “Somewhere Down The Crazy River” (Robbie Robertson)

From the album Robbie Robertson

Geffen Records, 1987

Somewhere Down The Crazy River

 

The Joshua Tree

U2: “Mothers Of The Disappeared” (U2)

From the album The Joshua Tree

Island Records, 1987

Mothers Of The Disappeared

 

 

 

 

45 RPM: The Who’s “Relay” [German 7″]

Here’s your ticket to some of the best (or, perhaps, most infamous) 7″ singles ever released! No adapter is required, although in my opinion the device pictured below is right up there with Little Debbie Swiss Cake Rolls as one of the best inventions of the 20th century.

45_adapter

 

We all know (I hope) that Al Gore didn’t invent the internet. Pete Townshend didn’t invent the internet either, but Pete can honestly say that he conceived the concept of an information superhighway long before Al and Tipper were secretly cranking up Twisted Sister albums. Just listen to the lyrics of The Who’s 1972 single “Relay”– yep, it’s about (as my wife likes to call it) “the interwebs.”

“Relay” was initially part of Pete’s conceptual Lifehouse piece, but it was left on the cutting room floor when that project was scrapped in favor of a single disc entitled Who’s Next. As great as Who’s Next turned out to be, it’s truly amazing to hear the quality of songs that were left off of the finished album. Many of these Townshend masterpieces were subsequently released as stand-alone singles during the gap between Who’s Next and Quadrophenia, including the prescient “Relay” (and let’s not forget “Join Together,” Let’s See Action,” “Long Live Rock,” and “Pure And Easy”– all of which were released over the next three years).

The Who always alternated their b-side writing credits so that each member could share in the publishing royalties, and it was Keith Moon’s turn to contribute a song for the flip side of “Relay.” As usual, Keith didn’t have anything of substance for the band to perform. No problem for a band like The Who– they simply jammed on a riff and let Keith goof off. The result: “Waspman,” one of the rarer songs in The Who’s entire catalog. “Waspman” was included on the Rarities Vol. II compilation released in the early ’80s, and finally appeared on CD on the 1987 compilation Two’s Missing. Both of these albums are long out of print, yet somehow “Waspman” has not appeared on any subsequent Who reissues. Maybe that’s for the best– I’ll let you decide for yourself…

Sting

“STING!”

 

Relay [German 7_]

The Who: Relay [German 7″]

Track Records, 1972

 

A-side: “Relay” (Pete Townshend)

Relay

B-side: “Waspman” (Keith Moon)

Waspman

______________________________________________

Bonus Tracks!

The first rule of The Analog Kid blog is that if you write about a song on the Analog Kid blog, you share the song on the Analog Kid blog.

 

Pinball Wizard [German 7_]

The Who: “Dogs Part Two” (Keith Moon)

B-side of the German 7″ Pinball Wizard

Polydor Records, 1979

Dogs, Part Two

 

Join Together [German 7_]

The Who: “Join Together” (Pete Townshend) [German 7″]

Polydor Records, 1972

Join Together

 

Let's See Action [Dutch 7_]

The Who: “Let’s See Action” [Dutch 7″]

Polydor Records, 1971

Let’s See Action

 

Odds & Sods 1

The Who: “Pure And Easy” (Pete Townshend)

Pure And Easy

The Who: “Long Live Rock” (Pete Townshend)

Long Live Rock

Both taken from the album Odds And Sods

Track Records, 1974

 

Stay Hungry

Twisted Sister: “I Wanna Rock” (Dee Snider)

From the album Stay Hungry

Atlantic Records, 1984

I Wanna Rock

The Lost Boys: Hard-To-Find ’80s Albums (“Color In Your Life” By Missing Persons)

“The Lost Boys: Hard-To-Find ’80s Albums” gives you exactly what the title implies: a rare or out-of-print album from the ’80s in its entirety. Some will be from CD, but most will have been lovingly transferred from pristine vinyl culled directly from the Analog Kid’s vast collection. Whatever album I choose, it will be one that you can’t easily find a physical copy for sale on Amazon or in your local record store (if you even have one anymore). Death…by stereo!

 

 

Missing-Persons

Even if you happen to be a big fan of ’80s new wave, there’s a strong chance that you have never heard Color In Your Life. The final album from Missing Persons was released in the summer of 1986, and it barely made a dent in the charts (the record peaked at #88 on the Billboard Album chart) or on MTV. The band disintegrated shortly after the release of the album, and that’s a real shame– Color In Your Life is actually a fantastic pop record, and I have no doubt that the Zappa exes had a few more great albums in them.

Color In Your Life was briefly released on CD in 2000 by One Way Records, but that version is long out of print. You can’t even download the album on Amazon or iTunes, although a couple of the tracks are available on various greatest hits collections. I created a brand-new 320 kbps rip from my vinyl copy of Color In Your Life last week, and I can’t seem to stop playing it. The Analog Kid hopes that you will enjoy this lost ’80s classic as much as I do!

 

Color In Your Life

Missing Persons: Color In Your Life

Capitol Records, 1986

320 kbps vinyl rip courtesy of The Analog Kid

 

1. “Color In Your Life” (Missing Persons)

Color In Your Life

2. “I Can’t Think About Dancin'” (Missing Persons)

I Can’t Think About Dancin’

3. “No Secrets” (Missing Persons)

No Secrets

4. “Flash Of Love” (Missing Persons)

Flash Of Love

5. “Go Against The Flow” (Missing Persons)

Go Against The Flow

6. “Boy I Say To You” (Missing Persons)

Boy I Say To You

7. “Come Back For More” (Missing Persons)

Come Back For More

8. “Face To Face” (Missing Persons)

Face To Face

9. “We Don’t Know Love At All” (Missing Persons)

We Don’t Know Love At All

 

Want to hear some more Missing Persons? Check out this post about the band’s 1982 breakout album “Spring Session M”:

https://theanalogkidblog.com/2014/07/16/the-lost-boys-hard-to-find-80s-albums-missing-persons-spring-session-m/

 

Lost In The Flood: Hard-To-Find ’70s Albums (“Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 2” By The Beatles)

The Analog Kid blog has been featuring out-of-print ’80s albums on “The Lost Boys” series for quite a while, and now it’s time for the ’70s to join the party! “Lost In The Flood: Hard-To-Find ’70s Albums” will give you the chance to listen to some great music from the ’70s that can no longer be easily acquired on-line or at your local record store (especially since many of you probably no longer even HAVE a local record store!).

 

It’s Beatles week here on the Analog Kid blog! Tell my why, you ask? Because in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make…

farley

“That…was…awesome!”

 

My last blog post featured a glorious 320 kbps vinyl rip of The Beatles’ Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 1, so you had to know that Volume 2 was on the way! If you didn’t read Tuesday’s entry, please do so now in order to properly appreciate today’s Beatle-related ramblings (I have thoughtfully provided you with a direct link):

https://theanalogkidblog.com/2015/07/07/lost-in-the-flood-hard-to-find-70s-albums-rock-n-roll-music-volume-1-by-the-beatles/

Rock ‘N’ Roll Music Volume 2 is definitely my favorite of the two compilations. There are a few hits on the album, but for the most part it focuses on some deeper cuts that really show off the band’s growth over their final five years together. “I’m Down” was immediately a favorite of mine, and at the time I had no idea that the McCartney scorcher had never before appeared on a U.S. album before the release of Volume 2.

I have a confession to make: until that day back in September of 1986 when I first played this album, I always thought that “Got To Get You Into My Life” was a Wings song. It’s an understandable mistake– after all, the bouncy tune would have fit in nicely alongside “Let ‘Em In” and “Silly Love Songs” on the 1976 Wings album Wings At The Speed Of Sound. Like those two classic Wings tracks, “Got To Get You Into My Life” also cracked the Billboard Top 10 in 1976 after Capitol released it as a single to promote Rock ‘n’ Roll Music. No wonder the little nine-year-old Analog Kid was confused!

Like my post for Volume 1, I have included high-quality 320 kbps mp3s of Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 2 for your enjoyment below. The George Martin mixes were unique to this 1976 release, and the album has never been released on CD. My advice to you is to play it LOUDLY.

 

Rock 'n' Roll Music, Volume 2

The Beatles: Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 2

Capitol Records, 1976

320 kbps vinyl rip courtesy of The Analog Kid

 

1. “Dizzy Miss Lizzie” (Williams)

Dizzy Miss Lizzie

2. “Any Time At All” (Lennon/McCartney)

Any Time At All

3. “Drive My Car” (Lennon/McCartney)

Drive My Car

4. “Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby” (Perkins)

Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby

5. “The Night Before” (Lennon/McCartney)

The Night Before

6. “I’m Down” (Lennon/McCartney)

I’m Down

7. “Revolution” (Lennon/McCartney)

Revolution

8. “Back In The U.S.S.R.” (Lennon/McCartney)

Back In The U.S.S.R.

9. “Helter Skelter” (Lennon/McCartney)

Helter Skelter

10. “Taxman” (Harrison)

Taxman

11. “Got To Get You Into My Life” (Lennon/McCartney)

Got To Get You Into My Life

12. “Hey Bulldog” (Lennon/McCartney)

Hey Bulldog

13. “Birthday” (Lennon/McCartney)

Birthday

14. “Get Back” (Lennon/McCartney)

Get Back

_____________________________________________

Bonus Tracks!

The first rule of The Analog Kid blog is that if you write about a song on the Analog Kid blog, you share the song on the Analog Kid blog.

 

Wings At The Speed Of Sound

Paul McCartney & Wings: “Let ‘Em In” (Paul & Linda McCartney)

Let ‘Em In

Paul McCartney & Wings: “Silly Love Songs” (Paul & Linda McCartney)

Silly Love Songs

From the album Wings At The Speed Of Sound

Capitol Records, 1976

 

Back In The U.S. Live 2002 [Disc 2]

Paul McCartney: “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)/The End [Live]” (Lennon/McCartney)

From the album Back In The U.S.: Live 2002

Capitol Records, 2003

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)/The End

Lost In The Flood: Hard-To-Find ’70s Albums (“Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 1” By The Beatles)

The Analog Kid blog has been featuring out-of-print ’80s albums on “The Lost Boys” series for quite a while, and now it’s time for the ’70s to join the party! “Lost In The Flood: Hard-To-Find ’70s Albums” will give you the chance to listen to some great music from the ’70s that can no longer be easily acquired on-line or at your local record store (especially since many of you probably no longer even HAVE a local record store!).

 

It’s Beatles week here on the Analog Kid blog! Tell my why, you ask? Because it’s important to know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall*…

beatles65

Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 1 was the first Beatles album that I actually purchased on my own. It was September of 1986, and I spent a whopping $3.99 for a new vinyl copy at the Sound Warehouse on Lamar Blvd. in Austin. I also picked up Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 2 that day, along with a copy of The Velvet Underground’s Loaded.

Lou Reed

Are you not entertained?

Don’t misunderstand me– I had certainly owned other Beatles music before that day. I grew up listening to (or, rather, scratching the hell out) of my parents’ copies of Revolver and Hey Jude, and I had received the red and blue greatest hits albums as Christmas presents back in high school. That day in Austin was different, though– this was my own purchase, and it set the stage for for my massive ingestion of the entire Beatles catalog over the next 12 months.

You see, my timing was perfect: in early 1987, Capitol Records finally started releasing the original U.K. versions of the Beatles’ albums on CD. I bought them all on the day of release, and by Christmas of ’87 I could sing the entire Beatle catalog forwards and backwards (and yet somehow, I avoided going on a vicious killing spree). And I haven’t stopped listening since…

Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 1 was originally released back in 1976 as part of a two-LP set. Producer George Martin actually created new mixes for the album after he heard the inferior quality of Capitol’s intended masters, and those mixes are unique to this release. Since Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 1 has never been issued on CD, I carefully created the 320 kbps rip presented below from the same record that I purchased in Austin on that memorable day back in 1986. I will leave it up to you to discover the differences in the versions, or to simply crank it up and dance around your apartment in your underwear singing “Bad Boy.” Not that I ever did that, of course…

 

Rock 'n' Roll Music, Volume 1 [320 kbps]

The Beatles: Rock ‘n’ Roll Music Volume 1

Capitol Records, 1976

320 kbps vinyl rip courtesy of The Analog Kid

 

1. “Twist And Shout” (Medley/Russell)

Twist And Shout

2. “I Saw Her Standing There” (Lennon/McCartney)

I Saw Her Standing There

3. “You Can’t Do That” (Lennon/McCartney)

You Can’t Do That

4. “I Wanna Be Your Man” (Lennon/McCartney)

I Wanna Be Your Man

5. “I Call Your Name” (Lennon/McCartney)

I Call Your Name

6. “Boys” (Dixon/Farrell)

Boys

7. “Long Tall Sally” (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell)

Long Tall Sally

8. “Rock And Roll Music” (Berry)

Rock And Roll Music

9. “Slow Down” (Williams)

Slow Down

10. “Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey” (Lieber/Stoller/Penniman)

Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey

11. “Money (That’s What I Want)” (Bradford/Gordy. Jr.)

Money (That’s What I Want)

12. “Bad Boy” (Williams)

Bad Boy

13. “Matchbox” (Perkins)

Matchbox

14. “Roll Over Beethoven” (Berry)

Roll Over Beethoven

 

* 4,000 holes (in Blackburn, Lancashire)

_____________________________________________

Bonus Tracks!

The first rule of The Analog Kid blog is that if you write about a song on the Analog Kid blog, you share the song on the Analog Kid blog.

 

Revolver

The Beatles: “She Said She Said” (Lennon/McCartney)

From the album Revolver

Capitol Records, 1966

She Said She Said

 

Hey Jude

The Beatles: “Rain” (Lennon/McCartney)

From the album Hey Jude

Apple Records, 1970

Originally released as the b-side of “Paperback Writer” in 1966

Rain

 

1962-1966 [Disc 2]

The Beatles: “Day Tripper” (Lennon/McCartney)

From the album 1962-1966

Apple Records, 1973

Originally released as a 7″ single in 1965

Day Tripper

 

1967-1970 [Disc 1] [320 kbps]

 The Beatles: “A Day In The Life” (Lennon/McCartney)

From the album 1967-1970

Apple Records, 1973

Originally released on “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” in 1967

A Day In The Life

 

Loaded

The Velvet Underground: “Who Loves The Sun” (Reed)

From the album Loaded

Cotillion Records, 1970

Who Loves The Sun