“The Lost Boys: Hard-To-Find ’80s Albums” gives you exactly what the title implies: a rare or out-of-print album from the ’80s in its entirety. Some will be from CD, but most will have been lovingly transferred from pristine vinyl culled directly from the Analog Kid’s vast collection. Whatever album I choose, it will be one that you can’t easily find a physical copy for sale on Amazon or in your local record store (if you even have one anymore). Death…by stereo!

 

Glenn

We live in a crazy universe. How else can you explain a world in which Joe Walsh is somehow still alive and well, yet Glenn Frey passes away at the seemingly young age of 67? Sure, Glenn lived his life in the fast lane back in the ’70s (who didn’t?)– but as the years rolled on, he always seemed like one of those rock stars who took care of himself. His death on Monday came as a complete surprise to me, but apparently there were some news reports published back in December about his health issues. I actually heard the news of Glenn’s passing on the car radio– we were listening to KLUV, an adult contemporary station here in North Texas. I usually make it a point to tune out blathering DJs, but I did hear him say something about Glenn Frey and The Eagles. I wasn’t really paying attention.

And then my wife semi-screamed, “Glenn Frey died!” And that I heard.

Glenn Frey was good at just about everything. He was good-looking, he wrote great songs, and he was a wonderfully under-appreciated guitar player (check out his amazing solo at the end of “I Can’t Tell You Why”). His death certainly means the end of The Eagles– Don Henley may be more famous than his frequent co-writing partner, but even Don will tell you that Glenn Frey led the band. I’m thankful that The Eagles got back together in 1994, and I’m happy that I was fortunate enough to see them live a few times. Their musicianship was impeccable, and their songs were extraordinary. I still get a rush every time I hear “Hotel California,” even though I know every nuance of the song inside and out. And yes, despite what I said above, I am also very thankful that Joe Walsh is somehow still with us! I’m just very sad that Glenn Frey isn’t…

 

No Fun Aloud was Glenn Frey’s first solo album after the initial breakup of The Eagles. The sax-driven “The One You Love” reached the top 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1982, and “I Found Somebody” was an early staple on MTV. The CD has been out of print for ages, and the album is not currently available as a digital download. The Analog Kid hopes you enjoy this charming little record– it’s a great testament to the talent and the cool smoothness of Mr. Glenn Frey.

Take it easy.

 

No Fun Aloud

Glenn Frey: No Fun Aloud

Asylum Records, 1982

Vinyl rip courtesy of The Analog Kid

 

1. “I Found Somebody” (Glenn Frey/Jack Tempchin)

I Found Somebody

2. “The One You Love” (Glenn Frey/Jack Tempchin)

The One You Love

3. “Partytown” (Glenn Frey/Jack Tempchin)

Partytown

4. “I Volunteer” (Jack Tempchin/Bill Bodine)

I Volunteer

5. “I’ve Been Born Again” (Don Davis/James Dean)

I’ve Been Born Again

6. “Sea Cruise” (Huey Smith/John Vincent)

Sea Cruise

7. “That Girl” (Glenn Frey/Bob Seger)

That Girl

8. “All Those Lies” (Glenn Frey)

All Those Lies

9. “She Can’t Let Go” (Glenn Frey/Jack Tempchin)

She Can’t Let Go

10. “Don’t Give Up” (Glenn Frey/Jack Tempchin)

Don’t Give Up

____________________________________________

Bonus Tracks!

The first rule of The Analog Kid blog is that if you write about a song on the Analog Kid blog, you share the song on the Analog Kid blog.

 

Hotel California

The Eagles: “Life In The Fast Lane” (Joe Walsh/Don Henley/Glenn Frey)

From the album Hotel California

Asylum Records, 1976

Life In The Fast Lane

 

 

The Long Run

The Eagles: “I Can’t Tell You Why” (Don Henley/Timothy B. Schmit/Glenn Frey)

From the album The Long Run

Asylum Records, 1979

I Can’t Tell You Why

 

Eagles Live [Disc 1]

The Eagles: “Hotel California” (Don Felder/Don Henley/Glenn Frey)

From the album Eagles Live

Asylum Records, 1980

Hotel California

 

Eagles

The Eagles: “Take It Easy” (Glenn Frey/Jackson Browne)

From the album Eagles

Asylum Records, 1972

Take It Easy

 

About The Analog Kid

"I'm 5-foot-8, 123 pounds. I have, uh, brown hair, blue eyes. I enjoy surfing, backgammon and men who aren't afraid to cry."

6 responses »

  1. pbev says:

    My copy of this LP got heavy play in college. “I Volunteer” was on a mixtape of mellow tunes I made. My vinyl is warped and while I still have the tape, my boom box is dead.

    Thanks!

    “Told every body they could kiss my ass, I’m going to Partytown!

    • I really am shocked that this CD is out of print– well, not so much the CD I suppose. But you can’t even download it, and that is a real shame. Glad to help you relive some good memories!

  2. Trev says:

    Sad to hear another huge talent has gone. Yet another rock star I thought would outlive me. Us children of the 80s are losing our heroes….

  3. Just an FYI that No Fun Aloud is available for purchase on iTunes. Don’t know when that happened, but I saw it this morning.

  4. It’s on Amazon now as well– it was added on 1/22/2016. I’m glad it’s available now, but sad that it took his death to make it happen…

  5. Leo says:

    Glen will be missed and thanks for the tribute to him. Speaking of Joe Walsh and killer guitar players: 1984 maybe, my buddy and I are running around an amusement park that is basically closed (after dusk), desperately trying to find a scalper to get us in to see Joe Walsh playing inside the park’s tiny concert hall. No luck. But as we mope around next to the shut down carousels and whack-a-mole booths. we’re lucky enough to at least hear the concert pouring through the open doors of the music hall. Joe’s playing is unreal; just shockingly great solos filling the air around us. Half hour later, the show’s over and everyone pours out. We try to score a t-shirt and suddenly, by this big tour bus, there he is! Joe Walsh, signing autographs and joking with fans. We sprint over, agog, and gush about how great he is. He looks up, thanks us, cracks a few jokes with us – making my year – and keeps on signing. And that’s when it hits me. He is drunk. Not buzzed, not lit, not sloppy. I’m talking legally blind, fall out a window and don’t feel a thing drunk. And then it hits me again. He was this drunk the whole concert, but his playing was majestic. Truth is stranger than fiction.

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