94.5 The Edge was the greatest radio station I have ever heard. It debuted in Dallas in the summer of 1989, and for five years it exposed me to more new alternative music than I could have ever imagined. In this continuing series, we’ll take a look back at the songs that made the Edge required listening for anyone with a musical pulse in North Texas in the late ’80s and early ’90s.

 

Songs From The Edge: 1991, Pt. 2

Spartacus

The Farm: “Groovy Train” (Grimes/Hooton)

From the album Spartacus

Sire Records, 1991

Groovy Train

greg-brady-johnny-bravo

GROOVY.

 

Space I'm In

The Candy Skins: “For What It’s Worth” (Stills)

From the album Space I’m In

Records, 1991

For What It’s Worth

Neil Young is often cited as a key influence by many alternative bands, but Neil’s Buffalo Springfield bandmate Stephen Stills had quite an impact as well. The Candy Skins’ version of the Stills classic “For What It’s Worth” was a staple on The Edge in the summer of 1991, as was Candy Flip’s cover of The Beatles’ “Strawberry Fields Forever. ” I guess that made 1991 my own personal Summer Of Love…

Note: this is the first song on today’s list to blatantly steal from the Stones classic “Sympathy For The Devil.” Can you guess what the next one will be?

 

Real Life

Simple Minds: “See The Lights” (Kerr/Burchill)

From the album Real Life

A&M Records, 1991

See The Lights

“Let There Be Love” was the biggest hit around the world from Real Life, the ninth album from Simple Minds. The Edge, however, focused its attention on “See The Lights” instead. I remember that that the station received a flood of calls asking about the release date for the new U2 album after it first played “See The Lights” in April of 1991. Charlie Burchill’s guitar does have a definite Edge (the Dave Evans variety) tone to it, but the U2 comparisons were a bit unfair– after all, Simple Minds had been crafting alternative anthems for more than twelve years by that point.

Useless fact that for some reason I remember: Real Life was the first CD I purchased after my college graduation in May of 1991. Just thought you might like to know…

 

Screamadelica

Primal Scream: “Movin’ On Up” (Gillespie/Innes/Young)

From the album Screamadelica

Sire Records, 1991

Movin’ On Up

Singer Bobby Gillespie really channeled his inner Jagger on “Movin’ On Up,” and comparisons to the Rolling Stones were inevitable after the song reached #2 on the U.S. Modern Rock Charts in 1991. I certainly hear the Stones in the song (dig that “Sympathy” guitar solo!), but I think another major influence has been overlooked– yes, we have circled back to our old friend Stephen Stills once again. The vocals on “Movin’ On Up” may be all Jagger, but the song structure is directly lifted from the 1971 Stills hit “Love The One You’re With.” Do do do…do do do!

 

Woodface 2

Crowded House: “Fall At Your Feet” (N. Finn)

From the album Woodface

Capitol Records, 1991

Fall At Your Feet

I understand that chart impact is not a basis for assessing the worthiness of a song, but sometimes I just have to shake my head (and then perhaps bash it into a brick wall four or five times). Case in point: “Fall At Your Feet” peaked at #75 on the Billboard Hot 100 right around the time that Bryan Adams’ “(Everything I Do) I Do It For You” was at #1– FOR SEVEN STRAIGHT WEEKS.

Picard-Facepalm

_____________________________________________________

Bonus Tracks!

The first rule of The Analog Kid blog is that if you write about a song on the Analog Kid blog, you share the song on the Analog Kid blog.

Madstock...

Candyflip: “Strawberry Fields Forever” (Lennon/McCartney)

From the album Madstock…The Continuing Adventures Of Bubblecar Fish

Atlantic Records, 1991

Strawberry Fields Forever

 

The Beatles_ Singles & B-Sides 1

The Beatles: “Strawberry Fields Forever” (Lennon/McCartney)

EMI/Parlophone Records, 1967

Strawberry Fields Forever

 

Beggars Banquet

The Rolling Stones: “Sympathy For The Devil” (Jagger/Richards)

From the album Beggars Banquet

London Records, 1968

Sorry guys, there used to be a link to a Stones song right here– until I got a notice that said, “You’re a very naughty boy, Mr. Analog Kid, Please remove our song from your site. Love, Mick & Keef.” I’m a little bummed, but also very honored to be sent a legal notice from the Stones!

 

Buffalo Springfield

Buffalo Springfield: “For What It’s Worth” (Stills)

From the album Buffalo Springfield

Atco Records, 1967

For What It’s Worth

 

Real Life

Simple Minds: “Let There Be Love” (Kerr/Burchill)

From the album Real Life

A&M Records, 1991

Let There Be Love

 

Stephen Stills

Stephen Stills: “Love The One You’re With” (Stills)

From the album Stephen Stills

Atlantic Records, 1970

Love The One You’re With

 

Waking Up The Neighbours

Bryan Adams: “(Everything I Do) I Do It For You” (Adams/Lange/Kamen)

From the album Waking Up The Neighbors

A&M Records, 1991

(Everything I Do) I Do It for You

 

About The Analog Kid

"I'm 5-foot-8, 123 pounds. I have, uh, brown hair, blue eyes. I enjoy surfing, backgammon and men who aren't afraid to cry."

4 responses »

  1. Snake Pliskin says:

    I know you are reviewing the greatness of the Edge, but my radio dial was faithfully set to the ZOO.Tempe Lindsey, Labella and Rody, George Gimarc, Charlie Jones, Jon Dillon, and Mike Reiner. The best music in DFW for a rocker….just sayin’ they need there props.

    • Oh, I have given props to the ZOO I promise! The Edge series starts in the year 1989, when the station debuted. I have another series called “Texas Radio & The Big Beat” that focuses on the ’80s classic rock of KZEW, Q102, and yes even KEGL. 🙂

  2. Snake Pliskin says:

    Apologies “their” props..lol…

  3. Mark says:

    I agree with you about the travesties of music charting. “Fall at Your Feet” has to be one of the finest examples of a superbly crafted pop song since “Yesterday” by the Beatles. I could listen to Neil Finn singing Donald Trump speeches and I might actually be convinced that America could be great again. : )

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